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Assuming you have read (or at least seen the movie) Order of the Phoenix then you are familiar with Umbridge. So what makes Stephen King proclaim her so villainous (and what makes her possibly the most hated HP character)?
Well let’s look at her character in detail, this post, sums it up nicely she is lawful evil.  She is the kind of evil we see in the world, . She is a bully someone who uses her position to do horrible things.  She is someone who sees what she is doing (no matter horrible )as the right thing.  She views herself as a loyal ministry employee stamping out corruption in society.
Chaotic evil like Voldemort or Bellatrix Lestrange are rare, but individuals who abuse our trust and bully others are something we see every day.  That is what makes Umbridge such a horrifying villain, she is not abstract evil, she is very re.al and likely reminds of someone we have met (just far more heinous).
So this is all about writing your charaters so whtat does our picture of lawful evil have to do wit that? Think about your villains (even your plain old antagonists) are they purely evil villains are theiry more like Umbridge? What motivates them, why do they do what they do? Looke at Umbridge’s motivations and what made her got sch extreme lengths.  Can your villain be put in a similar situation? Would they go to such lengths?

writtenwordsl:

ultrafacts:

SourceFor more facts follow Ultrafacts

Assuming you have read (or at least seen the movie) Order of the Phoenix then you are familiar with Umbridge. So what makes Stephen King proclaim her so villainous (and what makes her possibly the most hated HP character)?

Well let’s look at her character in detail, this post, sums it up nicely she is lawful evil.  She is the kind of evil we see in the world, . She is a bully someone who uses her position to do horrible things.  She is someone who sees what she is doing (no matter horrible )as the right thing.  She views herself as a loyal ministry employee stamping out corruption in society.

Chaotic evil like Voldemort or Bellatrix Lestrange are rare, but individuals who abuse our trust and bully others are something we see every day.  That is what makes Umbridge such a horrifying villain, she is not abstract evil, she is very re.al and likely reminds of someone we have met (just far more heinous).

So this is all about writing your charaters so whtat does our picture of lawful evil have to do wit that? Think about your villains (even your plain old antagonists) are they purely evil villains are theiry more like Umbridge? What motivates them, why do they do what they do? Looke at Umbridge’s motivations and what made her got sch extreme lengths.  Can your villain be put in a similar situation? Would they go to such lengths?

twiguard7
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THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

this post was a wild ride from start to finish

furbearingbrick:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

this post was a wild ride from start to finish

twiguard7

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This is a summary of college only using two pictures; expensive as hell.

That’s my Sociology “book”. In fact what it is is a piece of paper with codes written on it to allow me to access an electronic version of a book. I was told by my professor that I could not buy any other paperback version, or use another code, so I was left with no option other than buying a piece of paper for over $200. Best part about all this is my professor wrote the books; there’s something hilariously sadistic about that. So I pretty much doled out $200 for a current edition of an online textbook that is no different than an older, paperback edition of the same book for $5; yeah, I checked. My mistake for listening to my professor.

This is why we download. 

Spreading this shit like nutella because goddamn textbooks are so expensive. 

not necessarily art related but as someone who couldn’t afford their textbooks this semester this is a godsend

REBLOGGING because after a little digging, I found my $200 textbook for free in PDF form.

friendly reminder that this exists since I know we’re all going back to college soon

Will reblog every time I see it.

For everyone about to return to school